Provide Foot Care

Provide Foot Care

Categories Testing Tips Adsense Products Book & DVD Combo $64.99 $59.99 Complete Kit: Books, DVD and supplies $159.00 $129.00 CNA Textbook $42.00 Student Practice Kit $59.99 CNA Skills Made Easy DVD $29.99 Provide Foot Care Care Plan:  Provide foot care to a resident. Soap and water is used and foot care is provided to only one foot. The resident is sitting in a chair. The resident’s sock and shoe are replaced at the end of the skill. Denture Care Hand/Nail Care FAQ’s Click on each question to view the answer… Will the patient always be sitting in a chair for this skill? For the state exam, the patient will be positioned in a chair at the bedside.  In a clinical setting, this skill may need to be modified based on the individual needs and abilities of the patient. If the patient is unable to sit in a chair, the CNA will adapt the skill to the abilities of the patient, which may include consulting the nurse for specific accommodations. Why am I only washing one foot? For the state exam, only one foot needs to be washed to demonstrate proper technique. In a clinical setting, both feet will be washed using the same procedure. When should I notify the nurse if I notice any abnormalities on the feet? The nurse should be notified immediately upon noticing any bruising, wounds, rashes, blisters or any other abnormalities prior to proceeding with the rest of the skill. What should I do if the patient refuses foot care? Notify the nurse. If possible, find out from the patient why they are declining this...
Provide Hand and Nail Care

Provide Hand and Nail Care

Categories Testing Tips Adsense Products Book & DVD Combo $64.99 $59.99 Complete Kit: Books, DVD and supplies $159.00 $129.00 CNA Textbook $42.00 Student Practice Kit $59.99 CNA Skills Made Easy DVD $29.99 Provide Hand and Nail Care Care Plan: Provide hand and nail care to one hand. TESTING TIP: Let the patient check the water temperature. Click here for more info! Foot Care Feeding FAQ’s Click on each question below to view the answer… What if the patient has rings on? You may wash around the rings as you perform this skill or you may ask the patient to remove their rings and place them in a safe place. Do not ever place a patient’s rings on your finger for safekeeping, as the patient may interpret this as stealing or you may forget to return the rings at the end of the skill. Do not place them on the table, as they can be accidentally discarded or lost at the end of the skill. Are we supposed to clip their fingernails during nail care? No.  Clipping fingernails is generally not in a CNA’s scope of practice.  With regular hand and nail care, nails are kept short through filing and should not need clipping.  If the patient appears to need their fingernails clipped, you should notify the nurse. How often is this skill required in a clinical setting? The frequency of this skill will be outlined in each patient’s care plan. It is important to refer to the care plan for specific instructions on each individual patient. Should I wear gloves for this skill? You should wear gloves if you are...
Give the Patient a Partial Bedbath

Give the Patient a Partial Bedbath

Categories Testing Tips Adsense Products Book & DVD Combo $64.99 $59.99 Complete Kit: Books, DVD and supplies $159.00 $129.00 CNA Textbook $42.00 Student Practice Kit $59.99 CNA Skills Made Easy DVD $29.99 Give the Patient a Partial Bedbath Care Plan: Bathe a resident who is in bed and not able to help with his/her bathing. Wash the resident’s face, neck, back, one hand and arm, the chest and abdomen using soap and water. Dress the resident in a clean gown after bathing. The resident also needs a back rub. A mannequin will be used for testing. Bedpan Peri-Care FAQ’s Click on each question below to view the answer… Are gloves needed for this skill? Yes.  You will be touching personal skin on the patient (breast area) and should have gloves on to make the patient more comfortable.  Remember, if the patient (or you) have any rashes, cuts, sores or open skin, if you are going to touch skin normally covered by a bathing suit (genitals and breasts) or if you will be touching body fluids, you should wear gloves. Why don’t we use side-rails for this skill? For the Florida CNA exam, side-rails are not used. This is because CNAs can work in a variety of settings in which side-rails are not legally allowed, because their use is considered a restraint. Siderails may only be used with a doctor’s order. Therefore, it is important to learn how to safely perform this skill without side-rails by scooting the patient toward you then turning them on their side away from you in the center of the bed. Is peri-care part of...
Provide Peri-Care to Incontinent Resident

Provide Peri-Care to Incontinent Resident

Categories Testing Tips Adsense Products Book & DVD Combo $64.99 $59.99 Complete Kit: Books, DVD and supplies $159.00 $129.00 CNA Textbook $42.00 Student Practice Kit $59.99 CNA Skills Made Easy DVD $29.99 Provide Peri-Care to an Incontinent Resident Care Plan: Provide perineal care to a female resident who is incontinent of urine. The resident is lying in bed on an underpad that will be considered wet. The resident’s gown and bedding is dry. The role of the resident will be played by a mannequin. Bedbath Catheter Care FAQ’s Click on each question below to view the answer… Should I raise the entire bed to a comfortable working level when performing this skill? You may raise the bed if you wish, but it is not required for the exam. However, if you do raise the entire bed to a comfortable working height, you MUST remember to lower it at the end of the skill.  If the bed remains elevated, the floor is much further away than the patient will expect it to be when they get out of bed, which can result in a fall.  The head of the bed is adjusted to patient comfort at the end of every skill and does not need to remain in the low position. What if the patient does not want this skill performed? The student should make every effort to remain professional when describing the skill to be performed to minimize patient anxiety. However, most patients that need this service have been receiving peri-care frequently and should not object to it.  If the patient does object, notify the nurse. Why do we...